“The “Are you a feminist?” test is most often administered to young, female celebrities who have dared to challenge stereotypes or allude to their beliefs in gender equality. Interviewers never ask this question of male celebrities, and they rarely ask it of older women. And in the context of mainstream media, “Are you a feminist?” is not movement-building. It’s a trap. If young women say yes, tabloids and conservative pundits are quick to decry their perceived radicalism. And if they say no, they’ve got the feminist police to deal with. Usually, they take a middle ground: They decline the label but say a bunch of other smart things that make clear they’re quite aware of gender inequality and the need to remedy it.”
medievalpoc:

wildseedcometrue:

wildseedcometrue:

medievalpoc:

Lippo Memmi
Madonna and Child With Saints and Angels
Italy (c. 1350)
This painting is an example of Mongolian influence on art in Medieval Europe. The intricate gold figures on the hem of the Virgin Mary’s robes is actually Phags-pa Mongol script. This practice of using Mongol script in European Medieval art went unnoticed until Japanese scholar Hidemichi Tanaka published his findings…in 1983.
A related phenomenon is the use of Pseudo-Kufic (nonsense letters that look like Arabic to Europeans) script often used in similar artworks. The purpose appears to have been to make the cloth seem extremely fine-the best and most expensive cloth known to Europeans at the time all came from the Islamic nations of the Middle East, and nations farther east like China. The Mongolian invasion of Europe also had the effect of bringing trade in this kind of fine cloth with it-as well as the script used to decorate clothing in paintings like this one.
[x] [x] [x] [x]

this is also a thing with nonsense hebrew in paintings. one of the most fascinating things about the ecclesia vs. synagoga painting in the museum at oberlin is that even though it’s a copy of a better painting from another country, the hebrew in it is correct, and the hebrew in the original is gibberish. when i was introduced to the painting, it was suggested that this may indicate the work of a converso, or someone in a community of conversos, since the copied work was created in spain.

and here is the painting in question : http://www.oberlin.edu/amam/Spanish_FountainofLife.htm
it’s too bad that this writeup doesn’t seem to say anything about the hebrew, because that was the most interesting part of the story of the artwork for me.

Thanks for sharing info about this painting! I was aware that works like these were used for religious politics, and contained anti-Jewish material, especially on the Iberian Peninsula, but didn’t know about the script! Do you know anything about the passage or a translation that exists?
I wish that there was more info at the site about it-the image of the painting is definitely too small to make out any writing. For those interested, the term converso has an extremely important sociocultural/political history in  Spain, related to terms like morisco and marrano. (You can read a bit more on the analogous term morisco and how it may have been used here.) Although the terms were pejorative, it’s my understanding that there were other terms for these cultural/religious groups that had an extremely negative connotation (slurs), to the point that they were actually banned from use by the government. It’s my understanding that the Hebrew term for Jewish people forced to convert against their will is anusim  (more on the Medieval persecution and forced conversions here at the virtual Jewish Library).
This makes me very curious if there is an overall paper or book about the use of written languages considered “foreign” to the creator as decoration in European Medieval art, or really, art history from any country, especially nonsense letters or figures meant to look like that written language. It’s such a strange phenomenon, and one that continues to this day-especially with Chinese and Japanese writing. How “other” does something have to be in order to feel that confident in just writing random shapes meant to look like this or that written language?
It also makes me wonder (for example) if any of the Japanese Christian paintings, done in a European style like this one:

ever contained nonsense figures meant to look like Latin, or Spanish?
Although the misuse and or practice of imitating writing/characters is something I’ve seen some historians document as early as the 16th/17th centuries, I wonder just how far back this would go if more interdisciplinary research between linguists, literature historians, and art historians worked together on it?
Wow. I hope someone writes this book now. I think it could be made really accessible and fun to read.
medievalpoc:

wildseedcometrue:

wildseedcometrue:

medievalpoc:

Lippo Memmi
Madonna and Child With Saints and Angels
Italy (c. 1350)
This painting is an example of Mongolian influence on art in Medieval Europe. The intricate gold figures on the hem of the Virgin Mary’s robes is actually Phags-pa Mongol script. This practice of using Mongol script in European Medieval art went unnoticed until Japanese scholar Hidemichi Tanaka published his findings…in 1983.
A related phenomenon is the use of Pseudo-Kufic (nonsense letters that look like Arabic to Europeans) script often used in similar artworks. The purpose appears to have been to make the cloth seem extremely fine-the best and most expensive cloth known to Europeans at the time all came from the Islamic nations of the Middle East, and nations farther east like China. The Mongolian invasion of Europe also had the effect of bringing trade in this kind of fine cloth with it-as well as the script used to decorate clothing in paintings like this one.
[x] [x] [x] [x]

this is also a thing with nonsense hebrew in paintings. one of the most fascinating things about the ecclesia vs. synagoga painting in the museum at oberlin is that even though it’s a copy of a better painting from another country, the hebrew in it is correct, and the hebrew in the original is gibberish. when i was introduced to the painting, it was suggested that this may indicate the work of a converso, or someone in a community of conversos, since the copied work was created in spain.

and here is the painting in question : http://www.oberlin.edu/amam/Spanish_FountainofLife.htm
it’s too bad that this writeup doesn’t seem to say anything about the hebrew, because that was the most interesting part of the story of the artwork for me.

Thanks for sharing info about this painting! I was aware that works like these were used for religious politics, and contained anti-Jewish material, especially on the Iberian Peninsula, but didn’t know about the script! Do you know anything about the passage or a translation that exists?
I wish that there was more info at the site about it-the image of the painting is definitely too small to make out any writing. For those interested, the term converso has an extremely important sociocultural/political history in  Spain, related to terms like morisco and marrano. (You can read a bit more on the analogous term morisco and how it may have been used here.) Although the terms were pejorative, it’s my understanding that there were other terms for these cultural/religious groups that had an extremely negative connotation (slurs), to the point that they were actually banned from use by the government. It’s my understanding that the Hebrew term for Jewish people forced to convert against their will is anusim  (more on the Medieval persecution and forced conversions here at the virtual Jewish Library).
This makes me very curious if there is an overall paper or book about the use of written languages considered “foreign” to the creator as decoration in European Medieval art, or really, art history from any country, especially nonsense letters or figures meant to look like that written language. It’s such a strange phenomenon, and one that continues to this day-especially with Chinese and Japanese writing. How “other” does something have to be in order to feel that confident in just writing random shapes meant to look like this or that written language?
It also makes me wonder (for example) if any of the Japanese Christian paintings, done in a European style like this one:

ever contained nonsense figures meant to look like Latin, or Spanish?
Although the misuse and or practice of imitating writing/characters is something I’ve seen some historians document as early as the 16th/17th centuries, I wonder just how far back this would go if more interdisciplinary research between linguists, literature historians, and art historians worked together on it?
Wow. I hope someone writes this book now. I think it could be made really accessible and fun to read.

medievalpoc:

wildseedcometrue:

wildseedcometrue:

medievalpoc:

Lippo Memmi

Madonna and Child With Saints and Angels

Italy (c. 1350)

This painting is an example of Mongolian influence on art in Medieval Europe. The intricate gold figures on the hem of the Virgin Mary’s robes is actually Phags-pa Mongol script. This practice of using Mongol script in European Medieval art went unnoticed until Japanese scholar Hidemichi Tanaka published his findings…in 1983.

A related phenomenon is the use of Pseudo-Kufic (nonsense letters that look like Arabic to Europeans) script often used in similar artworks. The purpose appears to have been to make the cloth seem extremely fine-the best and most expensive cloth known to Europeans at the time all came from the Islamic nations of the Middle East, and nations farther east like China. The Mongolian invasion of Europe also had the effect of bringing trade in this kind of fine cloth with it-as well as the script used to decorate clothing in paintings like this one.

[x] [x] [x] [x]

this is also a thing with nonsense hebrew in paintings. one of the most fascinating things about the ecclesia vs. synagoga painting in the museum at oberlin is that even though it’s a copy of a better painting from another country, the hebrew in it is correct, and the hebrew in the original is gibberish. when i was introduced to the painting, it was suggested that this may indicate the work of a converso, or someone in a community of conversos, since the copied work was created in spain.

and here is the painting in question : http://www.oberlin.edu/amam/Spanish_FountainofLife.htm

it’s too bad that this writeup doesn’t seem to say anything about the hebrew, because that was the most interesting part of the story of the artwork for me.

Thanks for sharing info about this painting! I was aware that works like these were used for religious politics, and contained anti-Jewish material, especially on the Iberian Peninsula, but didn’t know about the script! Do you know anything about the passage or a translation that exists?

I wish that there was more info at the site about it-the image of the painting is definitely too small to make out any writing. For those interested, the term converso has an extremely important sociocultural/political history in  Spain, related to terms like morisco and marrano. (You can read a bit more on the analogous term morisco and how it may have been used here.) Although the terms were pejorative, it’s my understanding that there were other terms for these cultural/religious groups that had an extremely negative connotation (slurs), to the point that they were actually banned from use by the government. It’s my understanding that the Hebrew term for Jewish people forced to convert against their will is anusim  (more on the Medieval persecution and forced conversions here at the virtual Jewish Library).

This makes me very curious if there is an overall paper or book about the use of written languages considered “foreign” to the creator as decoration in European Medieval art, or really, art history from any country, especially nonsense letters or figures meant to look like that written language. It’s such a strange phenomenon, and one that continues to this day-especially with Chinese and Japanese writing. How “other” does something have to be in order to feel that confident in just writing random shapes meant to look like this or that written language?

It also makes me wonder (for example) if any of the Japanese Christian paintings, done in a European style like this one:

image

ever contained nonsense figures meant to look like Latin, or Spanish?

Although the misuse and or practice of imitating writing/characters is something I’ve seen some historians document as early as the 16th/17th centuries, I wonder just how far back this would go if more interdisciplinary research between linguists, literature historians, and art historians worked together on it?

Wow. I hope someone writes this book now. I think it could be made really accessible and fun to read.

The man-made “natural disaster”

prempanix:

It's all about money, honey

Remember this image, which spoke a thousand eloquent words about the June 2013 floods in Uttarakhand?

A Supreme Court-mandated committee finds that the unchecked building of hydro-power plants was the trigger behind the devastation. Read, an excellent report by Nidhi Jamwal.

View On WordPress

“In one experiment, mothers were asked to guess the steepness of a carpeted slope that their 11-month olds would be able to crawl. Then the children actually crawled the slope, and the difference between actual and mother-predicted angles was noted.

The results showed that both boys and girls were able to crawl the same degree of incline. However, the predictions of the mothers were correct within one degree for the boys and underestimated their daughter’s ability by nine degrees.

What this shows is that the presumption that boys are more physical causes parents to encourage their boys more in physical activities while cautioning their girls. This further translates into providing more opportunities for boys to be physical and fewer for girls. The result?

Boys actually do develop stronger physical skills than girls. But not because of anything innate or biological, but rather because of the gender roles that the parents subconsciously projected onto their babies.
tastefullyoffensive:

[via]

right about now
jessehimself:

nonespark:

nissan420sx:

AMERICAN NINJA WARIOR

A STREAKER CUT THE ACTUAL CONTESTANT OFF AND BLEW THROUGH IT LIKE HE’S SONIC THE FUCKING HEDGEHOG WHAT THE FUCK


OMG!!!!

jessehimself:

nonespark:

nissan420sx:

AMERICAN NINJA WARIOR

A STREAKER CUT THE ACTUAL CONTESTANT OFF AND BLEW THROUGH IT LIKE HE’S SONIC THE FUCKING HEDGEHOG WHAT THE FUCK

OMG!!!!

(via solipsism)

gnumblr:

Classic romance scenes improved with a Chipotle burrito

the best1!!! gnumblr:

Classic romance scenes improved with a Chipotle burrito

the best1!!! gnumblr:

Classic romance scenes improved with a Chipotle burrito

the best1!!! gnumblr:

Classic romance scenes improved with a Chipotle burrito

the best1!!! gnumblr:

Classic romance scenes improved with a Chipotle burrito

the best1!!!