Ah Matterhorn, some day i will gaze upon you with my own eyes. until then, stay beautiful!

(via bearded-architect)

amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for
amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for
amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for
amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for
amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for
amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for
amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for
amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for
amandaonwriting:

Nine Wonderful Words About Words from 25 things you had no idea there were words for

africandiasporaphd:

Queen Quet Marquetta L. Goodwine, Chieftess of the Gullah/Geechee nation, stands outside of one of the three remaining praise houses on St. Helena Island, South Carolina. Built during the slave era, they were small places of worship for the Gullah and still serve an important spiritual role.

A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct

Growing up in Beaufort, South Carolina, in the 1970s, Pete Marovich often overheard locals speaking “a rapid-fire language that sounded similar to English.” At the time, he had no idea then that it was a dialect that had been passed down from their enslaved African ancestors, or that it was just a small piece of the distinct and rich culture of the Gullah people, who’d maintained a strong connection to their roots as, generation after generation, they remained along the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia (where they’re known as Geechee).

When Marovich moved to Hilton Head Island in the 1990s, he started meeting Gullah people and learning about their history and culture. Brought to America from “the primarily rice-producing regions of West and Central Africa,” the Gullah/Geechee people worked the plantations of the American southeast, where they “developed a separate creole language and distinct culture patterns that included more of their African cultural traditions than the African-American populations in other parts of the United States.” After emancipation, the Gullah/Geechee remained in the same rural coastal communities where they were once enslaved. For many years after that, their communities thrived without much interference from outsiders. They were free to continue long-held traditions of “making seagrass baskets, fishing with handmade nets, burying their dead by the seashore, and living life simply,” as Marovich wrote in the introduction to his book, Shadows of the Gullah Geechee.

Read more.

(via diasporadash)

“Woolf gave us limitlessness, impossible to grasp, urgent to embrace, as fluid as water, as endless as desire, a compass by which to get lost.”
Rebecca Solnit on Virginia Woolf’s interest in the unknown: http://nyr.kr/1iS38rK (via newyorker)

(via newyorker)

“banks shouldn’t be obscenely profitable: they’re intermediaries, and in an efficient economy their profits should be quite easily competed away. When bank profits are high, that’s a sign that the bank in question is extracting rents from the economy, rather than helping it to grow.”